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Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice (CRiSAP) is a research centre of the University of the Arts London dedicated to the exploration of the rich complexities of sound as an artistic practice.

 

Our main aim is to extend the development of the emerging disciplinary field of sound arts and to encourage the broadening and deepening of the discursive context in which sound arts is practised.

Research Feature: Here are some scores for you to do

An intensive weekend-long exploration of the feminist performance score through a number of modalities including reading, listening, watching, discussion, play and performance. An event departing from materials in the Her Noise Archive, lead by Cathy Lane, Holly Ingleton and Irene Revell, with funding from Creative Vouchers / AHRC this workshop was a collaboration between Electra and CRiSAP. The avant-garde score, deriving instruction for performance from the toss of a dice, the I Ching, a series of notes or a text, can be seen as a basis for 'free' composition based upon utopian and emancipatory ideals. While the sonic results of an open work could be appreciated as 'randomly generated', 'natural' or spontaneous, in fact the outcome may be tightly regulated by the specific political economy of the compositional structure.
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Member Profile: Artur M Vidal

Artur M Vidal is a Spanish-born saxophone player and sound artist who grew up in Paris and currently resides in London. As such, he has performed and recorded extensively in the UK, France and Spain, as well as also being active in Turkey, Mexico and the Czech Republic. His work involves field recordings, sound walks, dance and improvisation, and he is an active member of the improvised music scene, playing and recording with artists and musicians who include Grundik Kasyansky, Jennifer Allum, Ruth Barberan, and Sébastien Branche, with whom he makes up the improvising saxophone duo ‘Relentless’.
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News: Corporeality album by Ingrid Plum

Ingrid Plum’s new album Corporeality demands that you listen louder. Corporeality draws on the archive of sound poet Lily Greenham, and utilises shimmering sine-tone structures, intensely-grounded field recordings, and the interior of a grand piano to explore spaces amongst the oscillating layers of sound. At the core of the album is Plum’s voice and the unique circuitry of the EMS VCS4 synthesiser. Plum weaves these elements together into embodied, intimate compositions that get under your skin and activate an interior landscape of listening.
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